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The European Commission considers the corridors the most important element for delivery of the core TEN network. The planning and determination of the core network corridors took place after defining the core TEN network in accordance with a special methodology of the European Commission. This involved an attempt to integrate the existing ERTMS and rail freight corridors. According to the European Commission, the core network corridors are to make a crucial contribution towards delivering the entire core network by the end of 2030. Every corridor is managed by a coordinator. Together with the Member States affected, they draw up work plans and implement them. In addition, the coordinators receive support from corridor forums and working groups, to which infrastructure managers as well as representatives from the regions and civil society can be invited. However, decisions can only be taken by the Member States.
After consultation with the Member States affected, the Commission appointed the following coordinators:

  • Catherine Trautmann (North Sea-Baltic Corridor)
  • Pat Cox (Scandinavian-Mediterranean Corridor)
  • Carlo Secchi (Atlantic Corridor)
  • Péter Balázs (North Sea-Mediterranean Corridor)
  • Iveta Radičová (Mediterranean Corridor)
  • Karla Peijs (Rhine-Danube Corridor)
  • Pawel Wojciechowski (Rhine-Alpine Corridor)
  • Anne Elisabet Jensen (Baltic Adriatic Corridor)
  • Mathieu Grosch (Orient-East-Med Corridor)

Additionally, there are coordinators for two "horizontal priorities":

  • Kurt Bodewig (Motorways of the Sea / MoS)
  • Matthias Ruete (European Rail Traffic Management System / ERTMS)

There are six corridors running through Germany, and thus more than through any other Member State: the North Sea-Baltic, Scandinavian-Mediterranean, Atlantic, Rhine-Danube, Rhine-Alpine and Orient-East-Med. Furthermore, Germany is involved in the two horizontal priorities, MoS and ERTMS.

In 2014, the coordinators conducted extensive corridor studies together with the Member States and supported by a consortium of consultants. These investigated to what extent the corridors currently meet the requirements or the technical parameters of the TEN Regulation for the comprehensive and core network. At the same time, they were to identify major deficiencies, whose elimination is a priority from a European perspective. This was the basis for work plans that define priorities for future activities on the respective corridor. According to the European Commission, the most severe problems exist in cross-border infrastructure, technical interoperability (e.g. ERTMS) and the integration of the different modes of transport.

The cooperation between the Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure (BMVI) and the coordinators is close and conducted in an environment of trust. This is especially due to far-reaching overlaps of priorities. Almost all major upgrading and new construction projects under the 2030 Federal Transport Infrastructure Plan are on TEN corridors. Additionally, the majority of the funds for structural maintenance are allocated to the TEN-T network.

North Sea-Baltic

Catherine Trautmann

Catherine Trautmann
Coordinator
Link to the interactive map North-Baltic Sea
FeaturesThe North Sea-Baltic Corridor is 3.200km long, only runs through Northern Europe and connects the Baltic Sea region of Helsinki via the Baltic States with the North Sea region in Belgium and the Netherlands via Poland and Germany. It includes Rotterdam, Antwerp, Hamburg, Bremen/Bremerhaven and Amsterdam and, thus, the five largest ports of Europe. The traffic volume in the Western part is very different from the Eastern part.
Major projects of the European Commission on the Corridor
  • "Rail Baltica": major project for connecting the Baltic States with Central Europe
  • Enhancing the hinterland connections of the sea ports
  • Developing urban nodes
  • Upgrading the Amsterdam/Rotterdam - Hannover - Berlin - Poland/border railway lines
Major ongoing projects in Germany
  • Bridging missing links on the A30 at Bad Oeynhausen
  • Upgrading the A1 and A27 motorways
  • Electrifying the Oldenburg-Wilhelmshaven railway line
  • Upgrading measures for the Hamburg/Bremerhaven - Hannover area
  • Improving the waterway network (esp. German Unity Transport Project 17 and canal network in Western Germany)
"Cofinanced by the European Union"

Atlantic

Prof. Carlo Secchi

Prof. Carlo Secchi
Coordinator
Link to the interactive map Atlantic
FeaturesThe Atlantic Corridor comprises over 6,500km of railways, 4,500km of roads and 290km of inland waterways, seven inland ports, eight sea ports, seven core network airports, 14 road/rail terminals and seven urban core network nodes.
Major projects of the European Commission on the Corridor
  • Upgrading high-speed lines in France, Spain and Portugal; enhancing interoperability on the railways (track gauge, ERTMS)
  • Establishing logistics platforms
  • Upgrading the Saarbrücken - Mannheim high-speed line (POS Nord) and equipping it with ERTMS
Major ongoing projects in Germany
  • Upgrading the Saarbrücken - Ludwigshafen line (POS Nord); upgrading the Neustadt – Boehl-Iggelheim and Landstuhl – Kaiserslautern lines with a maximum speed of 200km/h and implementing ETCS
"Cofinanced by the European Union"

Rhine-Danube

Karla Peijs

Karla Peijs
Coordinator
Link to the interactive map Rhine-Danube
FeaturesThe Atlantic Corridor consists of 5,700km of railways, 4,870km of roads network and 3,650km of inland waterways, 19 inland ports, two sea ports, 11 core network airports, 27 road/rail terminals and 14 trimodal terminals.
Major projects of the European Commission on the Corridor
  • Inland navigation: Danube river engineering scheme
  • Rail: Upgrading the Stuttgart – Ulm – Augsburg line/constructing a new high-speed line
  • Upgrading the Munich - Mühldorf – Freilassing line
  • Rail links between Nuremberg/Munich – Prague
Major ongoing projects in Germany
  • Upgrading the Munich - Landshut - Regensburg - Furth im Wald - D/CZ border line
  • Upgrading the Danube between Straubing and Vilshofen
  • Upgrading the Munich - Mühldorf – Freilassing line
  • Upgrading the Stuttgart - Wendlingen line/constructing a new high-speed line, incl. Stuttgart 21
  • Constructing the new Wendlingen - Ulm railway line
  • Upgrading the section between Freilassing - D/A border – Salzburg
  • Upgrading the Danube between Straubing and Vilshofen
"Cofinanced by the European Union"

Rhine-Alpine

Pawel Wojciechowski

Pawel Wojciechowski
Coordinator
Link to the interactive map Rhine-Alps
FeaturesThe Rhine-Alpine Corridor runs through the major Western German industrial centres and some of the most densely populated and richest areas of the EU. It connects the Dutch and Belgian North Sea ports with the Mediterranean region and is one of the busiest freight routes in Europe.
Major projects of the European
Commission on the Corridor
  • Prioritised equipment of the railways with ETCS
  • Upgrading the Emmerich - Oberhausen line/constructing a new high-speed line
  • Upgrading the Karlsruhe – Basel line/constructing a new line
Major ongoing projects
in Germany
  • Upgrading the Karlsruhe – Basel line/constructing a new line with partial upgrading of the existing line
  • Upgrading the (Amsterdam -) D/NL border - Emmerich - Oberhausen line
"Cofinanced by the European Union"

Orient - East Med

Matthieu Grosch

Matthieu Grosch
Coordinator
Link to the interactive map Orient / Eastern Mediterranean
FeaturesThe Atlantic Corridor comprises over 5,900km of railways, 5,600km of roads and 1,600km of inland waterways, 10 inland ports, 12 sea ports, 15 core network airports, 25 road/rail terminals and 15 urban core network nodes.
Major projects of the European
Commission on the Corridor
  • High-speed rail link between Dresden and Prague
  • Enhancing the navigability of the Elbe
  • Reducing the standing time for rail freight at border-crossing points
Major ongoing projects
in Germany
  • Upgrading the Oldenburg - Wilhelmshaven line with electrification; improving the line; subsurface strengthening and constructing new sections
  • Upgrading measures in the Hamburg/Bremerhaven - Hannover area
  • Upgrading the Berlin - Dresden line
  • Overall strategy for the Elbe
  • Upgrading the A10 motorway in the Berlin area
"Cofinanced by the European Union"

Scandinavian-Mediterranean

Pat Cox

Pat Cox
Coordinator
Link to the interactive map Scandinavia-Mediterranean
FeaturesThe Scandinavian-Mediterranean Corridor contains over 9,300km of railways and 6,300km of road network and is thus the longest core network corridor. 25 core network ports, 19 core network airports, 44 road/rail terminals and 18 urban core network nodes.
Major projects of the European
Commission on the Corridor
  • Fehmarnbelt Fixed Link (tunnel connection under the Baltic Sea) with feeder lines
  • Brenner base tunnel with respective feeder lines (rail)
Major ongoing projects
in Germany
  • Planning for the Fehmarnbelt fixed rail link
  • Upgrading the Nuremberg – Erfurt line/constructing a new line
  • Upgrading the Hof - Marktredwitz - Regensburg line
  • Upgrading the A3 and A99 motorways in Bavaria
  • Upgrading the A7 motorway in Hamburg, Schleswig-Holstein and Lower Saxony
"Cofinanced by the European Union"

"Motorways of the Sea"

Prof. Kurt Bodewig

Prof. Kurt Bodewig
Coordinator

Within the context of delivering the trans-European transport network, the Motorways of the Sea are part of the horizontal priorities. The definition of the Motorways of the Sea is enshrined in Article 21 of the TEN Regulation 1315/2013:

Motorways of the sea, representing as they do the maritime dimension of the trans-European transport network, shall contribute towards the achievement of a European maritime transport space without barriers. They shall consist of short-sea routes, ports, associated maritime infrastructure and equipment, and facilities as well as simplified administrative formalities enabling short-sea shipping or sea-river services to operate between at least two ports, including hinterland connections.

According to this priority, Coordinator Kurt Bodewig pursues the following objectives:

  • establishing an unlimited European maritime transport space;
  • filling the gaps between core network corridors by integrating maritime transport;
  • promoting European and international sea freight traffic;
  • developing new technologies including the creation of efficient infrastructure for alternative fuels at the ports.
Examples of projects with German participation
  • LNG for shipping and logistics in Europe
  • DOOR2LNG -Upgrade of the maritime link integrated in the multimodal container transport routes
  • FAMOS Odin: Finalising Surveys for the Baltic Motorways of the Sea
  • Blue Baltics – LNG infrastructure facility deployment in the Baltic Sea Region
  • ReaLNG: Turning LNG as marine fuel into reality in the North Sea-Baltic region
  • Back from Black - Study and deployment of the affordable scrubber retro fitting technology for SME shipowners
  • Environmental compliance and service upgrade of the North Sea MoS Cuxhaven-Immingham
  • Motorway of the Sea Rostock-Gedser - Part 2
"Cofinanced by the European Union"

ERTMS

Matthias Ruete

Matthias Ruete
Coordinator

The implementation of the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS) is another horizontal priority in the delivery of the trans-European transport network.

The overall objective of this priority is to enable interoperability along the entire rail network of the European Union.

In accordance with TEN Regulation 1315/2013, the rail infrastructure of the core network is to be completed by the end of 2030 and the rail infrastructure of the comprehensive network is to be entirely equipped with ERTMS by 2050. Isolated networks form an exception from this requirement.

Examples of projects in Germany or with German participation
  • Equipping the German part of the Rhine-Alpine corridor network with ERTMS
  • Planning and equipping six cross-border sections with ERTMS as well as filling in two gaps on the core network corridors
  • Supporting the introduction of ERTMS
"Cofinanced by the European Union"


Trans-European Transport Network - Cooperation with EU Coordinators
Trans-European Transport Network - Cooperation with EU Coordinators

Source: BMVI

On 15 May 2016, Minister Dobrindt welcomed the EU Coordinators to the Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure in Berlin. During more than two hours, the draft Federal Transport Infrastructure Plan was discussed. From left to right: Karel Vinck (ERTMS), State Secretary Rainer Bomba, Pawel Wojciechowski (Rhine-Alpine Corridor), Karla Peijs (Rhine-Danube Corridor), Pat Cox (Scandinavian-Mediterranean Corridor), Mathieu Grosch (Orient-East Med Corridor), Federal Minister Alexander Dobrindt, Catherine Trautmann (North Sea-Baltic Corridor), Prof. Carlo Secchi (Atlantic Corridor).